Mental Health Advisory Panel provides advice and guidance on the issues impacting on people with mental health problems and their families.  The panel is advising on local, innovative solutions that can make a difference.


  • Lucy Brogden

    Lucy is a distinguished businesswoman and psychologist and will be the next Chair of the Australian Government’s National Mental Health Commission. She has been a highly-skilled Commissioner for the Government’s peak mental health body for three years.
    Lucy’s primary areas of focus are issues facing Mental Health and Wellbeing particularly in the workplace and the community. She takes an evidence based approach to problem solving and social investment. Lucy has more than 25 years’ commercial experience with companies including Macquarie Group and Ernst & Young and more than 10 years in organisational psychology.

  • Sarah Garnett

    Sarah was a Corporation Communications Producer for 20 years before founding The Footpath Library, Australia’s only free giving library for homeless people. Since 2003, Sarah has had extensive face-to-face experience with homeless people, many of whom have a mental health problem. Sarah was an Australian of the Year Local Hero finalist in 2012, completed a Bachelor of Arts Anthropology degree in 2017 (ignited by her interest in human diversity) and holds Mental Health First Aider, Domestic Violence First Aid and Suicide Prevention First Aid certificate. Sarah is currently in a voluntary role as Managing Director of The Footpath Library.

  • Elisabeth Goh

    At some point in time, someone gave Elisabeth Goh a pencil. Little did they know that from that moment on, she would use it to empower young people. Graduating with an Arts & Law Degree from Macquarie University in 2017, Elisabeth has spent most of her university life advocating for better mental health services. She has worked with many leading organisations, including the KYDS Youth Development Service and headspace, as an ambassador, speaker, educator and policy leader. As an 18-year-old, Elisabeth assisted the Hon. Matt Kean MP in establishing the Youth Forum Model, which has since become a NSW Department of Education Model of Excellence. Through her collaborative spirit, she helped KYDS Youth Development Service to open its doors to clients in Hornsby at the Art of Smart Campus. As the developer of the Art of Smart Community, Elisabeth was critical for delivering accessible and equitable skills-based HSC and career education to anyone with an internet connection. Elisabeth challenges her audience by removing barriers to envision a world of possibility.

  • Jenna Bateman

    Jenna has worked in the mental health sector for 25 years, initially as a clinician and manager in the public service sector. In 2000 she moved to the community sector recognising the value of psychosocial approaches to good mental health outcomes. She is a passionate advocate for mental health reform and has co-authored documents on social inclusion, trauma informed care and recovery-oriented practice. Jenna has driven development of the community managed sector through accredited training qualifications and supported development of the Mental Health Peer Work qualification. She was appointed to the taskforce to create the NSW Mental Health Commission and has been heavily involved in the development of the NSW Strategic Plan. Jenna was also a founding member of Community Mental Health Australia (CMHA) – the alliance of Australian State and Territory mental health peak bodies. Jenna is currently CEO of the Mental Health Coordinating Council. She is a qualified Mental Health Nurse and has a Bachelor of Arts and a Master’s Degree in Community Management.

  • Andrew McAnulty

    Andrew has, as a CEO, built the capability and capacity of three housing organisations, building substantial growth in each company which has culminated in the delivery of thousands of quality mixed tenure homes. Andrew is a respected community housing figure, both nationally and internationally, having delivered social, affordable and large scale urban renewal outcomes for over 20 years across Australia and the United Kingdom. His experience highlights the innovation and vision required to create cutting edge outcomes for projects which link Government, the private sector and the community housing sector – in order to actually deliver high quality affordable housing and place based urban renewal. Andrew is Chief Executive and Executive Director of not-for-profit Tier 1 Community Housing Provider Link Housing, and former Chairman of the NSW Government Affordable Housing Taskforce.

  • Dr. Grenville Rose

    Dr. Grenville Rose is a registered psychologist with a B.A. in Psychology and a PhD in Food Science. After gaining his Doctorate, Grenville worked in a small market research organisation in the food and beverage industry for 6 years. Tiring of the hard slog of making Coco Pops taste ever better Grenville became a registered Psychologist and worked on the Hepatitis NSW Helpline and in a research project with the University of Sydney in community pharmacies. Grenville then worked for 8 years as research manager in a rapidly growing mental health community managed organisation. Grenville is now semi-retired but is still engaged with a number of research and community organisations. Although much of it is a distant memory Grenville identifies as someone with lived experience of hepatitis C, injecting drug use, mental health issues, suicide and secondary homelessness.

  • Inspector Trevor Peterson

    Trevor has been a serving police officer for 29 years. He has always worked as an operational officer performing general duties and highway patrol. Trevor has worked at a number of different commands in both metropolitan and rural locations and been an Inspector for the last 6 years. He has completed the Mental Health Intervention training and has previously been involved in mental health panels at previous commands.

  • Lyn Anderson

    Lyn has 27 years’ experience caring for a loved one with mental illness. She is a founding member of the North Shore Carers Network, is a carer representative with Carers NSW and the Schizophrenia Fellowship (now One Door Mental Health). She was previously a member on the Steering Committee for Sydney North Shore and Beaches Partners in Recovery. She works as a Carer Consultant with Mental Health Carers NSW.

  • Dr. Guy Gordon

    Dr. Guy Gordon is a general practitioner currently working in private practice in the Northern Beaches of Sydney. In recent years, he has focused on mental health and has undergone further training in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy as well as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, a form of MiCBT (mindfulness integrated CBT). Guy has developed an RACGP accredited workshop (AML 1) for GP self–development. This program is mindfulness based and aims to help GPs better manage their stress while simultaneously increasing their resilience to burn-out and depression. He also works as a Medical Educator for the Black Dog Institute NSW, facilitating mood disorder workshops for GPs. Dr. Gordon has facilitated community based mental health psycho-educational workshops in the areas of stress management and anxiety. These were delivered through the Manly Warringah Division of General Practice. Prior to his current practice, Dr Gordon has worked in the pharmaceutical industry as an Associate Medical Director. His portfolio was depression and antidepressants and responsibilities included involvement in research and development and providing therapeutic expertise to medical practitioners.

  • Brent Davison

    Brent is a 36 year old Aboriginal man, born and raised in Taree, NSW where his mum and her family are from. They are the Biripi mob. Brent’s father is from Sydney, and from the Gadigal clan. Brent completed a Diploma in Business Leadership and Management this year and is currently studying Certificate 4 in Community Services at TAFE. He has been working with adults with intellectual disabilities and special needs for approximately 5 years (Recreation Program, Independent Living Support). He has also been working with children in several different capacities (Before & After School Care, Royal Far West, Transport & Contact Support Worker for Children in Out of Home Care). He and his partner have recently become foster carers and are caring for an 11 year old Aboriginal boy every second weekend.
    Brent strives for a better society and wants to give back to the community, believing passionately that all people are entitled to fair treatment and dignity. He wants to advocate for those that are marginalised.

  • Adrian Talbot

    Adrian enlisted in the Royal Marine Commandos in 2005 and in March 2006, he was deployed to Afghanistan. Whilst serving as a Commando, Adrian completed Military Police training at Portsmouth and was then sent to Royal Marine Barracks Stonehouse as an investigator. In 2009 Adrian was injured while training to become a close personal protection operative, and was subsequently discharged after extensive surgeries and rehabilitation.
    Adrian is the current Executive Manager for the RSL Life Care Homes for Heroes program, a role he has held for two years. Adrian was also a competitor at the inaugural Invictus Games in 2014, winning two Gold Medals for Australia. Adrian has been invited to be a Clubs NSW Ambassador for the Sydney 2018 Invictus Games. Adrian sits on the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Ex Service Consultative Forum and is an executive member of the Veterans’ Centre Sydney Northern Beaches.
    The Homes for Heroes program provides accommodation to former service members who have become homeless, or have found themselves at risk of homelessness. These individuals face injuries, both physical and psychological and often suffer further breakdowns in the family unit. The Homes for Heroes community stands to provide support and remind these individuals of their sense of belonging and provide them with the ability to get back on their feet. Homes for Heroes has supported 104 veterans since its inception in 2014. Currently Homes for Heroes is supported by RSL LifeCare and by RSL Services Association. The program receives no government support or assistance and relies on partners like ClubsNSW, who came on board as a major partner in 2015.